Category: Planning System

Planning Mechanics | One Book July 2022

Planning Mechanics | One Book July 2022

I know I go on and on about having a planning system that works with your brain. The planning mechanics are the subsystems and parts that make a planning system work.

— A place for everything, and everything in its place.

— Be creative with your page real estate.

— Sticky Notes!

— Incorporate printables! This applies to all planners, including bound books. Don’t hesitate to glue in or tip-in a printable ( ). We are incredibly lucky to have access to a wealth of printable inserts. Don’t skip using them just because you’re in a bound book! If it works for your brain, throw it in there! If it saves space (hello to my A6 and smaller planner people!), throw it in there! I use yearly foldouts for my husband’s game schedule for work; finances; large, multi-part, long-term projects (home improvements, specifically); and project index. It makes way more sense for me to keep all of that info on a one-page foldout for each item rather than using three or four spreads in my pocket Moleskine otherwise. That also allows for one spread to be dedicated to that “topic,” so the pages of the bound book that surround that tip-in can hold sticky notes or permanent notes that belong there as well… all of the pertinent information in one spread. Also, gluing in monthly calendars instead of having to draw them in every month guarantees that I’ll stay in a book longer… by about the third month of drawing in monthlies, I’m way over it.

— Pre-decorate for dailies, notes at the end of those pages. I am genuinely shocked that having different “page types” interspersed with each other doesn’t bother me; a few years ago, it would’ve bothered me to no end. I know that this is the best use of space in this small, bound format, and I know this setup and size are what I need right now, so having dailies/notes/journaling all interspersed isn’t bothering me at all.

— Quick curation: do I need this long-term (more than a month)? If not (a short/term, small project), I use a sticky note in the Project section or a page or two in the Daily notebook. If yes, at least a sticky note in the monthly or projects, or a spread or two in the Projects section. If not sure, then sticky note on the Weekly until I decide. Quick curating comes with being familiar with and comfortable in your system. I don’t want to think about where I should put something. I don’t want to think about where I might find a specific something when I need it. If I have to put too much thought into either placement or retrieval, I’ll constantly think about that instead of leaving that mental energy open for more important things. I don’t want to spend mental energy thinking about the mechanics. I need the mechanics to just work.

— Abbreviate when necessary, don’t worry about taking up space when I need it. I need space for school notes (formulas I need to memorize, steps involved in solving certain types of problems)… the stuff I need to commit to memory so well that little to no effort goes into retrieving it from my brain when I need it. This goes into curation. And sticky notes. If I’m not sure, sticky note on the Weekly. I can always dedicate a page or spread to it in a day or two if necessary.

— Section Linking! Information flows from one section to the next and back again. Projects and all of their steps go in the Projects section. Projects get listed on the Weekly (just the “title”, no specific steps), specific tasks for that project go on Dailies. There, I’ve linked three separate sections of my planner. This ties in to using page real estate (and time) wisely. I don’t need to list every step for a project on my Weekly because those steps are already listed in the Projects section. I just need the Project title/name on the Weekly so I remember to make some headway on it. When I’m setting up my day the night before, I look at my Weekly, see that project name listed, flip to it in my Project section, and add any tasks I want to finish from that project just in the next day. This also keeps my mental clutter at a minimum; I put my mental energy and time into the project steps that are on the Daily. The rest is in the Project section; I don’t have to worry about forgetting it or losing it.

— Timed things. A timeline, a list, what does your brain like? What looks the least distracting or confusing? I struggle with things that happen at :15, :20, and :45 because I have a lot of them and they don’t fit nicely into regular timeline inserts (usually). So I did what my brain defaults to anyway right now: a list.

— Yearlies act like a filter, (monthly) info I want to see without the noise of the other things in the same calendar.

LINKS

Tons of free printables and great information at Philofaxy

— Beautiful, free printables from NeverPaperLand

— If you’d like to see the full set-up of this planner, it’s .

Planner Needs | One Book July 2022

Planner Needs | One Book July 2022

Figuring out my planner needs was fundamental in building my system.

My main, absolutely necessary need is the Seamless Flow of Information, both into and out of my planner and within the planner itself, amongst the sections. I don’t want to have to think about where to put incoming information, and I shouldn’t have to think about where to retrieve information when I need it.

I also need:
— Quick capture of information: Reminders, the Drafts app, and Fantastical

— A “Filtered” Yearly (finances and travel schedule)

— Monthly (full year): out of the ordinary schedule things, game schedule, due dates, monthly task list, quarterly goals (not in a separate space or I forget about them), memory keeping

— Weekly (full year is not a need but I like it): daily schedule for each person whose schedule I’m responsible for, day-specific tasks, due dates, weekly task list (which includes project tasks)

— Daily: daily schedule broken down by drop off and pickup times, day/specific tasks, notes about what I did that day, journaling, blank space for whatever I need at a moment’s notice

— Projects: set up by their particular needs, currently active projects on sticky notes in the current monthly section

— Tabs: quick access to information

— Sticky notes: moving information easily, quick notes, printable sticky notes for specific needs

— Portability: I use my planner more when it’s always with me. The more I use it, the better the system becomes.

— Options: Right now, my brain craves the ease in turning to a blank space and using it for whatever I need. My current setup accommodates that need in my Daily book.

— Pockets: to keep spare sticky notes, my ruler, stickers, keepsakes

Wants:

— Pretty things: some tasks just aren’t fun to see written in your planner because you’re dreading doing them. At least having a pretty space to do them in makes them a little more tolerable.

— Photos: make my planner uniquely mine

— These aesthetic things make my planner enjoyable. I take a few minutes every morning just to flip through my planner and simply enjoy it. I made a reel about it here: https://bit.ly/FirstFourMinutes

— A cover that feels good: I want to enjoy the material from which it is made, the weight of it, the size of it in my hand.

You can find your own planner needs in any number of ways, and I’m sure there are more than I’ll offer here.

You can start with a blank book and only add the things you have decided you absolutely need. Then, as time, progresses, you can add or remove things as needed.

Starting with a predesigned system can also be a great place to start. Something from Franklin Covey, Filofax, or Day Designer is all set up and ready to use. Then you can add and remove things as you need.

Free printables are also a great way to jump start building your system. Philofaxy and Peanuts Planner Co offer great free printables if you’d like to start there.

2022 Planning System – College Classes Included!

2022 Planning System – College Classes Included!

I waited to record this until after my classes started so we could see the system in its entirety. This is one of many reasons that having a system that works for your brain is key… I’ve gone back to college full-time, and I knew I didn’t have to worry about how I was going to organize all of it. I simply slotted all of the new schedules and tasks into my existing system.

For me, the most important feature of a dependable planning system is ease of information in and information out. I need to be able to get information out of my head and into a reliable system where it won’t get lost. My planner works for me, I don’t work for it. It is my planner’s job to free up as much brain power as possible so I can allocate that brain power to producing and living rather than remembering upcoming tasks and dates.

Planner Flip-Through | September 2021

Planner Flip-Through | September 2021

I love seeing how other people utilize their planners because it makes me a better planner. Seeing someone else’s system, regardless of the format (rings, strings, bound, digital, whatever) can help me think about my system in a different and beneficial way.

I recently realized that, while planner flips are some of my favorite videos to watch, I never post them myself! In order to remedy that situation, immediately, I recorded a flip-through of my September 2021 inserts, all full and messy.

One Book July 2019 | Week 2 Readalong

One Book July 2019 | Week 2 Readalong

This was a bit of a difficult video to make, because, as Ryder Carroll himself says, this part of the book reads a bit like stereo instructions. It’s a lot of ground to cover in one video without feeling like I’d be overwhelming people. I’ve done my best to give an overview of the mechanics of a bullet journal.

All of our social media details…

RHOMANY
YouTube
Instagram
Patreon
Blog

MISSVICKYBEE
YouTube
Instagram
Patreon
Blog
Etsy

MIMI
YouTube
Instagram
Site
Blog

ME
YouTube
Instagram
Twitter

Last updated by at .